Allapattah Flats students learn about overcoming obstacles through Stella the Whale

Allapattah Flats students learn about overcoming obstacles through Stella the Whale

Kindergarten through second grade students at Allapattah Flats K8 School recently were visited by Wyland Foundation, along with Stella the Whale.  Stella is a near life size canvas painting of a baby right whale. Students got to take part in a unique exercise in goal setting to help Stella migrate 700 miles from one end of the state to the other. Stella’s epic 30-day journey is part of an effort to draw attention to the plight of the endangered north Atlantic right whale whose numbers have dwindled in recent years to less than 400. To mirror the average traveling distance in a right whale’s migration, Stella will stop every twenty miles at schools and children’s centers, starting Oct. 14 in Key Largo and concluding Nov. 17 at the Right Whale Festival in Jacksonville. Each stop on Stella’s route will include presentations from marine mammal experts and educators, a photo opportunity with Stella, and activities for students to use Stella’s journey to identify their own goals for environmental conservation, health and wellness, and academic success. Stella gives students a chance to understand the perilous migration that whales undertake every year from their winter calving areas off Florida to the feeding grounds off Nova Scotia, according to the Wyland Foundation, and her journey provides a unique way of understanding the importance of overcoming obstacles to achieve goals.

Students create interactive hallways at Allpattah Flats

Students create interactive hallways at Allpattah Flats

Seventh grade students in Christine King’s class at Allapattah Flats K-8 School created an interactive bulletin board of the short story “The Tell-Tale Heart” by Edgar Allan Poe. The board gives other students, through the use of a flip chart, the opportunity to get a synopsis of the short story that will encourage them to seek Poe’s entire classic work out and read it on their own. The learning goal was for students to understand that text has meaning and students should be able to use dominant strategies and skills to construct that meaning.  Pictured, from left, are Ahlyissa Hicks, Zachary Grundstrom, Joshua Bailey, Jesus Paz, Jayson Tabora, and Haley Roberson.

Ft. Pierce Central cadets shine at regional competition

Ft. Pierce Central cadets shine at regional competition

The Fort Pierce Central High School ROTC Raiders team competed recently in regional competition among 16 Florida high schools and 49 teams to qualify for state competition. The Cobra battalion brought four teams a male team under Cadet Master Sergeant James Lowery and a second male mixed team under Cadet Staff Sergeant Daniel Grundstrom. The first male mixed team, under Cadet Lieutenant Colonel Robert Grundstrom, brought home third place in the three mile team run. The female team under Cadet Major Kayla Hartseil placed third in the three mile team run, third place in the rope bridge and third place overall. The members of the all female Raider team are Cadet Sergeant Alyssa Charles, Cadet Major Guadalupe Velasco, Cadet Sergeant First Class Nicole Geldmaker, Cadet Major Kayla Hartseil, Cadet Captain Gabriella Hernandez, Cadet Private Judi Moody, Cadet Sergeant Ariel Baldwin, and Cadet Sergeant Alyssa Leal.

Mariposa Elementary kindergartners learn math hands-on

Mariposa Elementary kindergartners learn math hands-on

Students in Linda Auciello’s kindergarten class at Mariposa Elementary recently enjoyed a hands on math activity that taught them many lessons combined into one. They learned about ordering numbers up through 10, the concept of one more, and counting objects up to 10. Pictured is Shane Lesser counting his sets of blocks. He realized that when you make each set of blocks one more than the previous one then it looks like a set of stairs! Math is so much more fun when you can do it hands on!

Northport student inspired by letter from author

Northport student inspired by letter from author

Northport K-8 fourth grader Cierra Yuhas knew she was having difficulty with reading comprehension. She spoke to her teacher, Carissa Provencher, who provided some valuable advice: select your favorite book, contact the author and get some tips on how to better understand concepts from books. Cierra took her teacher’s words to heart and wrote a letter explaining the situation to Cynthia Lord, author of “Rules”, Cierra’s favorite book.  Lord wrote Cierra a very special letter with some words of advice to keep reading, to look closely at everything because it becomes more beautiful. The author also advised Cierra that her book was inspired by her son, who has autism like the book’s main character, and told Cierra to look out for her next book called “Touch Blue”. Cierra has been so inspired by the letter from Cynthia Lord that she is reading more than ever, as well as looking forward to writing her own Young Author’s book. Pictured is Cierra with her book and letter.