Army Ranger Dedicated Jump #53 to Northport Children!

Army Ranger Dedicated Jump #53 to Northport Children!

Second Lieutenant, Army Ranger, Xiovani Guanill dedicated his 53rd parachute jump to NPK* students. Xiovani attended school at Northport and graduated from our Landsharks team. He was just a regular funny kid with a sarcastic and witty sense of humor. Xiovani Guanill wanted in some way to make his parents proud because he grew up with his mom in a wheelchair. He floated around a little then joined the United States Army. He served in Iraq and Afghanistan. He even visited Northport children one time and his helmet still had Iraqi sand in it. He pushed and trained and persevered in the face of many dangers. Today, Xiovani is an officer and an Army Ranger who has been all over the world. He wants to make sure that the children understand that it was hard work and perseverance that enabled him to accomplish his goals. JUMP #53 to the children of Northport…. OORAH! Much love and thanks to Xiovani for being a great role model.

Art and Essay Contest

Art and Essay Contest

Art Contest 

(Grades K-3)

Governor Rick Scott and First Lady Ann Scott’s Hispanic Heritage Month Art Contest is open to all K-3 students in the state of Florida. Two winners will be selected.

Entry Dates: Entries must be mailed to Volunteer Florida: Hispanic Heritage Month Committee, 3800 Esplanade Way, Suite 180, Tallahassee, Florida 32311. All entries must be received no later than 5:00 p.m. EDT on Monday, October 15, 2018. Emailed, scanned, or faxed entries will not be accepted. Contestants are responsible for all shipping costs.

Awards: Winners will be notified after October 22, 2018. Winners will receive a prize at Governor Rick Scott and First Lady Ann Scott’s Hispanic Heritage Month celebration to be held in Tallahassee. Reasonable travel and lodging expenses will be paid for the winners and one immediate family member.

2018 Art Contest Rules, Guidelines & Waiver Form(.PDF)

2018 Art Contest Rules, Guidelines & Waiver Form (.PDF) – Spanish

 

Essay Contest

(Grades 4-5, 6-8, 9-12)

Governor Rick Scott and First Lady Ann Scott’s Hispanic Heritage Month Essay Contest is open to all 4th through 12th grade students in the state of Florida. Three winners will be selected: one elementary (4-5) student, one middle (6-8) student, and one high school (9-12) student.

Entry Dates: Entries can be mailed to Volunteer Florida, Hispanic Heritage Month Committee, 3800 Esplanade Way, Suite 180, Tallahassee, Florida 32311, or submitted electronically. All entries must be received no later than 5:00 p.m. EDT on Monday, October 15, 2018. Contestants are responsible for all shipping costs. Entries submitted electronically will receive email confirmation.

Awards: Winners will be notified after October 22, 2018. Winners will receive a 4-Year Florida College Plan scholarship provided by Florida Prepaid College Foundation. Winners will receive awards at Governor Rick Scott and First Lady Ann Scott’s Hispanic Heritage Month celebration to be held in Tallahassee. Reasonable travel and lodging expenses will be paid for the winners and one immediate family member.

Contact Volunteer Florida at (850) 414-7400 for any further questions.

Online Submission

2018 Hispanic Heritage Month Essay Contest Online Submission

2018 Hispanic Heritage Month Essay Contest Parent/Legal Guardian Waiver Form (required for Online Submission)

Paper Submission

2018 Essay Contest Rules, Guidelines & Waiver Form (.PDF)

2018 Essay Contest Rules, Guidelines & Waiver Form (.PDF) – Spanish

Art classes at Allapattah Flats work on enlarging scale

Art classes at Allapattah Flats work on enlarging scale

Fifth grade students in Tekia Montgomery’s elementary art classes at Allapattah Flats K-8 are re-introduced to the concept of enlarging.  They will create enlarged drawings from small pictures using a grid technique. Students will use T- squares and work together to make a large grid where they will transfer their original drawings into a larger scale. This year’s theme is under the sea. This particular project is done every year, and although this project is a bit of a challenge for the students, it seems to be a favorite! Pictured are Calendra Holbrook and Jorge Liberate taking their time with their underwater creations.

Art In The Capitol

Art In The Capitol

Student artwork from around the district was amazing, and the decision was difficult for the judges.  Artists demonstrated depth, movement, brush strokes, detail, and flow in their work.  Comments from the judges also focused on dynamic contrasts within art selections that included delicacy and boldness, as well as vibrancy and stillness.

 

Congratulations are extended to all participants.  The following submissions were recognized at the October School Board meeting with the first place winner’s artwork being presented to Representative Larry Lee’s office.  This piece will hang in the State Capitol for the entire Legislative session.

 

Congratulations to the winners of the Art in the Capitol Contest!

 

Honorable Mention

Luis Marriquin – 7th Grade – Ft. Pierce Magnet School of the Arts

“Jungle King”

Gerard Saltus – Teacher

3rd place

Alana Edwards – 7th Grade -Northport K-8

“The Bloom”

Valarie Kirk – Teacher

2nd Place

Brooklyn Warens – 7th Grade – Palm Pointe Educational Research School @ Tradition

“Intelligent Design”

Diane Turner – Teacher

1st Place

Kiera Natta –  7th Grade – Palm Pointe Educational Research School @ Tradition

“Autumn’s Last Leaf”

Diane Turner – Teacher

 

Art In The Capitol

Art In The Capitol

As part of an annual appreciation of the Arts in education, students share various selections of art in hopes of their piece being selected and placed on display the State Capitol.  This year’s Art in the Capitol selection honors the artistic abilities of Oak Hammock eighth grader Amber Hobbs.

Representative Delores Hogan Johnson was present at the May School Board Meeting to recognize Amber and celebrate her work.

Art on Display in NY

Art on Display in NY

Students’ ceramic art pieces from Art Instructor Katherine Avra’s classes at Fort Pierce Central High School are on their way to the New York City National Art Education Conference this month.  These selections join other entries from across the United States as showcase pieces by Skutt Ceramics.

Students were challenged to create functional peep hole plugs of specific dimensions from clay and fired in a kiln.  Bill Jones, editor of Pottery Making Illustrated, judged the designs which will become part of a permanent traveling Peep Plug Collection.  According to Avra, students were enthusiastic about participating and even more excited to discover that their creations will be part of a traveling art show.

March is Arts Education Month

March is Arts Education Month

March is nationally recognized as Music in Our Schools Month, Theatre in Our Schools Month, Dance in Our Schools Month and Youth Art Month. The Florida Department of Education values the arts and acknowledges the impact they have on student development and academic achievement. The arts not only offer students an opportunity for self-expression and personal growth, but interdisciplinary activities involving the arts can also improve comprehension and challenge students to approach learning in new ways.

Join Treasure Coast High School as they celebrate with The Believe Project.  This festival and workshop celebrates music and dance as true art forms.  To find out more, visit http://the-believe-project.weebly.com

Arts In Education

Arts In Education

SLWCHS students, under the direction of Mr. Brian Hoce, work to perfect their performance in preparation for the upcoming marching band season.

St. Lucie Public Schools supports The Arts In Education.

 

Arts In Education are “Sweet”

Arts In Education are “Sweet”

At Frances K. Sweet, students and teachers are celebrating “Fine Arts in the School” month. Mr. Ingram’s classroom entrance welcomes students with “The Colors of Music” and each week they will be exploring a new genre of music. In Mrs. Miller’s Visual Arts class, students are exploring different medias and are voting on which piece of art will come out on top in our Sweet Sixteen championship! The students can keep track with graphs generated by their voting and a very large bracket set up on the wall of the main hallway.

The Fine Arts are all about creation and celebration at Frances K. Sweet!

 

ArtWalk for Hope and Bingo for Books

ArtWalk for Hope and Bingo for Books

River Edge Elementary hosted an ArtWalk for Hope and Bingo for Books Family Event on Thursday, April 7. Students created “hopeful” images on sidewalks around the entire school. From flowers to pizza to rainbows students were given creative freedom to share their ideas of HOPE.

IMG_5806 IMG_5807 IMG_5804

Parents came at 6 pm to take in all their student’s artwork, then were invited into the cafeteria and greeted with an “artful” treat provided by the PTO.

IMG_5800

Bingo for Books began at 6:30 pm with their parents, students played round after round in hopes of winning a book!

IMG_5795 IMG_5796

Assistant principal Sanabria recognized by education commissioner

Assistant principal Sanabria recognized by education commissioner

Treasure Coast High School Assistant Principal Henry Sanabria was recognized at the Florida Department of Education Commissioner’s Leadership Award luncheon recently as St. Lucie County’s nominee for 2014 Outstanding Assistant Principal of the Year. Pictured are Sanabria, left, and Commissioner Pam Stewart. Congratulations for this outstanding achievement.

Atlantic Coast High School Rifle Meet

Atlantic Coast High School Rifle Meet

On Saturday December 15, 2018, Port St. Lucie High School’s Army JROTC Jaguar Battalion Marksmanship Team attended their first rifle competition of the season at Atlantic Community High School. We competed against eight other schools with 63 total participants. Cadets who competed were Cadet Private Emma Lewiston who ranked 24th, Cadet Private Riley Riaccard who ranked 27th, Cadet Major Joleen Kalinowski who ranked 20th, Cadet Corporal Mackenzie Moad who ranked 39th, Cadet Captain Mathew Simmons who ranked 22nd, Cadet Sergeant First Class Edward Cook who ranked 17th, Cadet Private Austin Griffin who ranked 34th, Cadet Master Sergeant Max Marrero who ranked 35th, and Cadet Private Harold Radenheimer who ranked 45th.

Both Jaguar teams competed at 7:30am starting with prone, then standing, and lastly kneeling positions. They all enjoyed their first experience at the meet.

This article was written by Cadet Captain Alexis Morris and photography was taken by Cadet Sergeant Joseph Locklar.

Atlantic High School Raider Meet

Atlantic High School Raider Meet

On Saturday September 29, 2018, Port St. Lucie High School Jaguar Battalion’s Raider Team attended their first Raider Meet of the season at Atlantic Coast High School. Our mixed team of six males and four females came in second place under the host school Atlantic Community High School. The Raider Event consisted of: a rope bridge construction, 500 push-ups, 500 sit-ups, 100 pull-ups, a mile run while carrying a stretcher with a stimulated patient, a half mile kettlebell carry, and a tractor trailer tire flip weighing in at over 400 lbs. The team finished off the event with multiple obstacles including low crawl, under and over, and commando crawl.

AT&T Donates $2,000

AT&T Donates $2,000

Mr. Ian Cotner, Regional Director for AT&T, presented a $2,000 check to the Education Foundation as part of the corporation’s effort to support STEM education and provide experimental learning opportunities for students.

The funds will be used to support Career and Technical Education and middle school drone programs.

 

ATT recognized for anti-texting while driving campaign

ATT recognized for anti-texting while driving campaign

ATT was recognized at the November 13, 2012, St. Lucie County School Board meeting for its “It Can Wait” project, an awareness campaign to educate and inform teenagers about the dangers of texting while driving. The national campaign made a stop at Treasure Coast High School (TCHS) recently, with a simulated experience for young drivers what can happen in the split second of texting on a cell phone while operating a vehicle. Pictured, from left, are Assistant Superintendent Dr. Mark Rendell, who shephered the project in the district, Catherine McKenzie of ATT, School Board chairman Carol Hilson, TCHS principal Densire Rodriguez holding a poster board of students’ pledges not to text while driving, and Superintendent Michael Lannon.

St. Lucie School Board adopts texting while driving proclamation

St. Lucie School Board adopts texting while driving proclamation

Communications giant AT&T and over 200 other companies are urging drivers to pledge not to text while driving. September 19, 2013 was designated as a national “Drive 4 Pledges Day”. Drivers across the country were asked to sign pledges to refrain from texting while driving. The St. Lucie County School Board adopted the “Drive 4 Pledges Day” proclamation at its September 10, 2013 meeting. Pictured, from left, are Assistant Superintendent Dr. Mark Rendell, School Board Chair Debbie Hawley, Deputy Sheriff Shirley Lindstadt, AT&T Regional Director Cathy McKenzie, AT&T Strategic Account Manager Nancy Vinez. Standing behind the group is Superintendent Genelle Yost, left, and Jim McKenzie, Executive Director of the St. Lucie County Education Foundation.

Attendance and Single School Culture – A Perfect Recipe for Success!

Attendance and Single School Culture – A Perfect Recipe for Success!

Northport second grade (and a few first graders) celebrated perfect attendance for the month of September. ❤ 🌞

At Northport, one of our main objectives is to make sure that children and families know how important school attendance is to achieving our educational goals. Attendance and a positive single school culture offer our students, teachers and support staff an optimal environment for excellence in education.

Attendance Matters

Attendance Matters

 

September is Attendance Awareness Month.

Improving attendance and reducing chronic absence is not rocket science, but it does take commitment, collaboration and tailored approaches to the particular strengths and challenges of each school or community. Across the nation, schools, communities and advocates have successfully taken steps to ensure children are attending school more regularly.

Help to ensure our children are in school each day.

 

 

Attendance Awareness Month

Attendance Awareness Month

September is Attendance Awareness Month – an opportunity to bring attention to and support building a habit of good attendance. St. Lucie Public Schools (SLPS) Superintendent E. Wayne Gent emphasized the importance for all students to attend school regularly.  “Regular attendance is vital for our students’ success. Chronic absenteeism negatively impacts student achievement and graduation rates. Our goal is to give every student the best opportunity for success in life, so let’s help create habits of positive attendance early in their academic careers.”

Showing up for school has a huge impact on a student’s academic success starting in kindergarten and continuing through high school. Even as children grow older and more independent, families play a key role in making sure students get to school safely every day and understand why attendance is so important for success in school and in life.

Some absences are unavoidable due to health problems or other circumstances. However, when students miss too much school— regardless of the reason – it can cause them to fall behind academically.  A student is less likely to succeed if he or she is chronically absent—which means missing 18 or more days over the course of an entire school year. Research shows:

  • Children chronically absent in kindergarten and 1st grade are much less likely to read at grade level by the end of 3rd grade.
  • By 6th grade, chronic absence is a proven early warning sign for students at risk for dropping out of school.
  • By 9th grade good attendance can predict graduation rates even better than 8th grade test scores.

Absences can add up quickly.  A child is chronically absent if he or she misses just two days every month!!

Here are a few practical tips to help support regular attendance:

  • Make sure your children keep a regular bedtime and establish a morning routine.
  • Lay out clothes and pack backpacks the night before.
  • Ensure your children go to school every day unless they are truly sick.
  • Avoid scheduling vacations or doctor’s appointments when school is in session.
  • Talk to teachers and counselors for advice if your children feel anxious about going to school.
  • Develop back up plans for getting to school if something comes up.  Call on a family member, neighbor, or another parent to take your child to school.

 

 

 

Attendance Matters – September Is Attendance Awareness Month

Attendance Matters – September Is Attendance Awareness Month

ST. LUCIE COUNTY – September is Attendance Awareness Month – an opportunity to bring attention to and support building a habit of good attendance. St. Lucie Public Schools (SLPS) Superintendent E. Wayne Gent emphasized the importance for all students to attend school regularly.  “Regular attendance is vital for our students’ success. Chronic absenteeism negatively impacts student achievement and graduation rates. Our goal is to give every student the best opportunity for success in life, so let’s help create habits of positive attendance early in their academic careers.”

Showing up for school has a huge impact on a student’s academic success starting in kindergarten and continuing through high school. Even as children grow older and more independent, families play a key role in making sure students get to school safely every day and understand why attendance is so important for success in school and in life.

Some absences are unavoidable due to health problems or other circumstances. However, when students miss too much school— regardless of the reason – it can cause them to fall behind academically.  A student is less likely to succeed if he or she is chronically absent—which means missing 18 or more days over the course of an entire school year. Research shows:

  • Children chronically absent in kindergarten and 1st grade are much less likely to read at grade level by the end of 3rd grade.
  • By 6th grade, chronic absence is a proven early warning sign for students at risk for dropping out of school.
  • By 9th grade good attendance can predict graduation rates even better than 8th grade test scores.

Absences can add up quickly.  A child is chronically absent if he or she misses just two days every month!!

Here are a few practical tips to help support regular attendance:

  • Make sure your children keep a regular bedtime and establish a morning routine.
  • Lay out clothes and pack backpacks the night before.
  • Ensure your children go to school every day unless they are truly sick.
  • Avoid scheduling vacations or doctor’s appointments when school is in session.
  • Talk to teachers and counselors for advice if your children feel anxious about going to school.
  • Develop back up plans for getting to school if something comes up.  Call on a family member, neighbor, or another parent to take your child to school.

About St. Lucie Public Schools

The mission of St. Lucie Public Schools is to ensure all students graduate from safe and caring schools equipped with the knowledge, skills and desire to succeed. For more information visit, www.stlucieschools.org  or contact Kerry Padrick at kerry.padrick@stlucieschools.org.

 

###

Chronic Absence Solution