Zika Resources

Zika Resources

For accurate and up-to-date information and resources on the Zika virus, the following web links from the Florida Health Department in St. Lucie County are valuable resources:

Zika Virus Updates

http://www.floridahealth.gov/diseases-and-conditions/zika-virus/index.html

Spill the Water Campaign

http://www.floridahealth.gov/diseases-and-conditions/spill-the-water/

 

https://youtu.be/ayVop5Dx0YQ

PSLHS – Digital Innovation Winner

PSLHS – Digital Innovation Winner

Port St. Lucie High School’s TV Production students created this promotional video highlighting the school’s programs, opportunities, and culture.  The Jaguars took top honors in the SLPS Digital Innovation Challenge.

Congratulations!

PSLHS – Digital Innovation Winner

PSLHS – Digital Innovation Winner

Port St. Lucie High School’s TV Production students created this promotional video highlighting the school’s programs, opportunities, and culture.  The Jaguars took top honors in the SLPS Digital Innovation Challenge.

Congratulations!

Home Depot Supports PSLHS

Home Depot Supports PSLHS

The PSLHS 9th Grade Academy was awarded a grant from the Home Depot in Ft. Pierce!

They supplied us with paint and all the supplies to paint all the classrooms in our academy. They even provided volunteers to help us paint! We also had special guests there to help us. School board member, Troy Ingersoll, and Marty Sanders, the executive director over facilities for our district, came out to help too. We painted 11 classrooms, and we’re looking forward to our next painting day!

 

PSLHS Paint 5 PSLHS Paint 4  PSLHS Paint 1 PSLHS Paint 2

PSLHS Paint 3

PBIS Mariposa Butterfly Bucks Rock!

PBIS Mariposa Butterfly Bucks Rock!

At Mariposa Elementary, Butterfly Bucks are used when students are caught doing positive behaviors. When a teacher or administrator catches a student following one of the I CAN expectations, they hand them a butterfly buck and acknowledge the specific behavior the students were caught doing. The students then place them in their butterfly bank similar to the one pictured and save them to spend on special PBIS events or to buy a special item from the PBIS store.

I CAN expectations:

Act Responsibly
Be Respectful
Create Safety
Do My Best

LPA Seniors Are Committed to Graduate “C2G”

LPA Seniors Are Committed to Graduate “C2G”

Lincoln Park Academy Seniors had their first Senior meeting.  During the meeting several things were discussed by their class sponsor, Mr. Gray.  Mr. Sanabria, school principal, spoke to the students and shook the hand of every class senior to ensure that they are committed to graduate.  The seniors received a class shirt and signed the graduation gown as a symbol of their commitment!

 

Gray 3

 

 

 

 

 

C2G

 

c2g3

 

P8240086

 

P8240090

 

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Microsoft Student Advantage Program

Microsoft Student Advantage Program

Microsoft’s Student Advantage Program provides free downloads of the full version of Microsoft Office (Microsoft Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Outlook, OneNote, Publisher, Access, etc.) for all St. Lucie County students, in District operated schools, for use on their personal and mobile devices.
  • District students can download the software on up to 5 devices.
  • Download and activation requires a student network username and password which is provided to all actively enrolled students.
 
Click on this link for step-by-step directions:
Tunnels of Hope

Tunnels of Hope

St. Lucie Public Schools extends a special thank you to the civic groups, local businesses, and community agencies that supported back-to-school Tunnels of Hope for students and staff throughout St. Lucie County.

We are a Kids at Hope community with a strong belief that All Students Are Capable of Success — No Exceptions!

Ree Day 1Tunnel of Hope 2 2016 SGA

Day 1 WBE 5 Day 1 WBE 3 Day 1 NPK8 1 WG Tunnel Hope 2016 5 WG Tunnel Hope 2016 2 WG Tunnel Hope 2016 1

WCE Tunnel of Hope  5 2016

Local Educators Selected to Participate in Advanced Placement Program Reading

Local Educators Selected to Participate in Advanced Placement Program Reading

Two St. Lucie County Public Schools teachers were selected to participate in the College Board’s Annual AP Reading in World History. Sharon Ortiz, who teaches at Fort Pierce Central High School, and Celestine Dorsey, teacher at Fort Pierce Westwood High School, traveled to Salt Lake City this June to score AP World History Exams. Each June, AP teachers and college faculty members from around the world gather in the United States to evaluate and score the free-response sections of the AP Exams. AP Readers are high school and college educators who represent many of the world’s leading academic institutions. The AP Reading is a unique forum in which an academic dialogue between educators is both fostered and encouraged. “The Reading draws upon the talents of some of the finest teachers and professors that the world has to offer,” said Trevor Packer, Senior Vice President, AP and Instruction at the College Board. “It fosters professionalism, allows for the exchange of ideas, and strengthens the commitment to students and to teaching. We are very grateful for the contributions of talented educators like Celestine Dorsey and Sharon Ortiz.”

The Advanced Placement Program® (AP®) enables willing and academically prepared students to pursue college-level studies – with the opportunity to earn college credit, advanced placement or both – while still in high school. Through AP courses in 37 subjects, each culminating in a rigorous exam, students learn to analyze complex problems, construct solid arguments, and see many sides of an issue – skills that prepare them for college and beyond. Research indicates that students who score a 3 or higher on an AP Exam typically experience greater academic success in college and are more likely to earn a college degree than non-AP students.

Donation to CAM

Donation to CAM

A great big “Thank You” to Jeremiah Johnson, Scott Van Duzer, John Katsock, and Representative Larry Lee, Jr. for the amazing donations of 100 book bags full of school supplies and 45 electric pencil sharpeners to our school. We are very excited to be working together this year.

Pictured from left to right: Principal Jennifer Hedeen, Jeremiah Johnson, Scott Van Duzer, Eddie Robinson, John Katsock, and Representative Larry Lee, Jr.

Getting To Know One Another

Getting To Know One Another

Students in Mrs. Kasey Ascani’s second grade class at F. K. Sweet have no problems writing and talking about themselves. They were also very excited to share their All About Me backpacks with their classmates.

Pictured are Ariana Morrison and America Escobedo sharing their backpacks with Curious George.

Northport Welcomes Students

Northport Welcomes Students

What a wonderful pleasure to welcome new students and to celebrate returning students and families with a flourish.

Northport VPK-8 School and community welcomed back well over one thousand students on Monday, August 15. The morning was a culmination of planning and preparation on the part of the administration, teachers, and staff. The students and parents were heralded with the smiling, welcoming faces of so many in the community who want to wish all a great start to a fabulous school year. On hand to ring in the new year was Superintendent of SLPS, Wayne Gent, SLPS Board members, Katherine Hensley and Debbie Hawley, as well as many other district staff members.

Students were also greeted by local representatives from PSLPD, SLC Sheriff’s Office deputies, Big Brothers Big Sisters employees, local veterans and many, many other community members who have a strong desire to support our students and families. Northport realizes that we are not a closed building and once the school bell rings each morning, we do not shut the doors. We realize that we need the whole community to educate and empower our students. We welcome volunteers, business partners, veterans, animal rescue activists and all who want to assist in making Northport a vital and dynamic school that is supported by its community. We look forward to a stellar year filled with positive energy and community support. Northport is fully invested in “building a brighter future for our students” and supporting our families to the fullest extent.

Mariposa Elementary Welcomes New Monarchs

Mariposa Elementary Welcomes New Monarchs

Open House was a success! We had a great night welcoming our new and old students to Mariposa Elementary. Mr. Logue officially welcomed our new Kindergarten students and their families explaining that they are now officially Monarchs. After the orientation, the students were able to visit their classrooms and meet their teachers. There were stations set up to help parents complete their registration, find their buses, complete lunch applications, and apply to volunteer.

Pictured: Shannon Deah Marshall with her children Gia Goodman and Geoffrey Goodman. She attended open house to register Gia for fifth grade and meet her teachers.

We are looking forward to a fantastic school year at Mariposa Elementary.

Zika Resources

Zika Resources

For accurate and up-to-date information and resources on the Zika virus, the following web links from the Florida Health Department in St. Lucie County are valuable resources:

Zika Virus Updates

http://www.floridahealth.gov/diseases-and-conditions/zika-virus/index.html

Spill the Water Campaign

http://www.floridahealth.gov/diseases-and-conditions/spill-the-water/

Zika Q and A  (Source: http://www.floridahealth.gov/diseases-and-conditions/zika-virus/_documents/zika-virus-general-faq1.pdf)

Frequently Asked Questions: Zika Virus

1. What is Zika virus? Zika fever is a mild illness caused by a mosquito-borne virus similar to those that cause dengue and chikungunya virus infection. It has been identified in several countries in Central and South America, Mexico, and the Caribbean since 2015. Outbreaks have previously been reported in Africa, Southeast Asia, and the Pacific Islands. Local transmission has been reported in Puerto Rico and in a small area in Miami-Dade County. Zika virus is not transmitted person-to-person.

2. How is Zika virus transmitted? Zika virus is primarily transmitted through the bite of an infected mosquito, including the same mosquitoes that can transmit dengue and chikungunya. It can also be transmitted from a pregnant mother to her baby during pregnancy or around the time of birth. It is unknown how often this occurs or what stage of pregnancy is most at risk. There are no reports of infants getting Zika virus through breastfeeding. In addition, Zika virus can be present in semen and transmitted through sexual activity.

3. Who is at risk of being infected? Anyone who is living in or traveling to an area where Zika virus is found who has not already been infected with Zika virus is at risk for infection, including pregnant women.

4. What are the symptoms of Zika virus infection? Only about 1 in 5 people infected with Zika virus are symptomatic. Zika fever is a mild illness. Severe disease requiring hospitalization is uncommon. Signs and symptoms of Zika virus may include: acute onset of low-grade fever, rash, joint pain, conjunctivitis (reddening of eye), body aches, headache, eye pain and vomiting.

5. How soon do infected people get sick? People typically develop symptoms between 2 and 14 days after they are bitten by the infected mosquito. Zika fever is a mild illness with only 1 out of 5 cases known to show symptoms. Severe cases of the disease is uncommon.

6. What treatment options are available for Zika virus illness? Since there is no specific treatment against the virus, treat the symptoms by getting plenty of rest, drink fluids to prevent dehydration, take medicines to relieve fever and pain. Illness typically resolves within a week.

7. What should I do if I think I have Zika fever? If you feel that you might have Zika fever, please visit your health care provider. A health care provider will determine if the patient is exhibiting symptoms of Zika virus and discuss the patient’s travel history. If appropriate, based on the guidance from the CDC, the health care provider will order a specialized blood test or urine test. All testing has to be ordered by a health care provider, in communication with their department of health and CDC. Travelers returning home from areas with active Zika virus transmission should avoid being bitten by mosquitoes for three weeks following travel, especially while ill, to prevent infection of local mosquitoes. Women who were traveling in areas where Zika virus was active during their pregnancy should consult with their obstetrician.

8. What can I do to prevent the Zika virus? The Florida Department of Health encourages Florida residents and visitors to protect themselves from all mosquito-borne illnesses by draining standing water; covering their skin with repellent and clothing; covering windows with screens; and other basic precautions. DRAIN standing water to stop mosquitoes from multiplying

  • Drain water from garbage cans, house gutters, buckets, pool covers, coolers, toys, flower pots or any other containers where sprinkler or rain water has collected.
  • Discard old tires, drums, bottles, cans, pots and pans, broken appliances and other items that aren’t being used.
  • Empty and clean birdbaths and pet’s water bowls at least once or twice a week.
  • Protect boats and vehicles from rain with tarps that don’t accumulate water.
  • Maintain swimming pools in good condition and appropriately chlorinated. Empty plastic swimming pools when not in use.
    COVER skin with clothing or repellent
  • Clothing – Wear shoes, socks, and long pants and long-sleeves. This type of protection may be necessary for people who must work in areas where mosquitoes are present.
  • Repellent – Apply mosquito repellent to bare skin and clothing.
  • Always use repellents according to the label. Repellents with DEET, picaridin, oil of lemon eucalyptus, and IR3535 are effective.
  • Use mosquito netting to protect children younger than 2 months old.
    COVER doors and windows with screens to keep mosquitoes out of your house
  • Repair broken screening on windows, doors, porches, and patios.

9. Can Zika virus harm pets or livestock? There is no evidence to date that suggests that Zika virus can harm domestic pets or livestock.

10. What is the status of Zika virus in Florida? Florida has identified a small, one-square mile area in Miami-Dade County where active transmission of the virus is likely occurring. Florida’s small case cluster is not considered widespread transmission. The current number of travel and non-travel related cases can be found in the department’s daily Zika update, which is posted on our newsroom page.

11. Do you have Zika virus in Florida? The department has confirmed some non-travel related cases of Zika in Florida and the majority of these cases are related to a small area in Miami-Dade County where active transmission is occurring. There is no active transmission of Zika virus outside of the one-square mile area in Miami-Dade County. Florida has also reported some Zika cases among people who traveled to other countries and contracted the virus there.

12. What is being done to prevent transmission of Zika virus in Florida? Each suspected case of Zika virus infection is tested at the state public health laboratory. County health department staff report suspect Zika fever cases to local mosquito control staff to make sure mosquito control activities are put in place. State and local health departments work closely with other parties to make sure people at risk for Zika virus infections as well as health care providers stay informed with the most current science about Zika fever. We also provide education about effective repellents. These include products with DEET, picaridin, IR 3535 and some oil of lemon eucalyptus and para-methanediol products.

13. Do you think Zika virus will spread in Florida? We know, from our experience with dengue fever and chikungunya virus, which are spread by the same mosquito, that travelers who come back infected can infect local mosquito populations. With what we know from dengue and chikungunya, it is very unlikely we will have large outbreaks of Zika fever in the United States. One major reason for this is that we have better housing with air conditioning and intact screens that protect us from being bitten by mosquitoes in our homes. When locally acquired mosquito-borne illness is present, the department works closely with mosquito control to stop further transmission of the virus of concern. Mosquito control and the health department jointly provide public education whenever possible as well since it is very important that all residents cooperate and drain containers on their property at least weekly to help successfully control this mosquito. We would follow the same protocol for an outbreak of Zika virus.

14. Where can I find the most current information on Zika virus activity in Florida? The department has created a webpage with a variety of resources for the public and health care community. Each day the department updates the website and issues a press release with case count information at 2 p.m. The department continues to proactively communicate with health care professionals, specifically obstetricians, regarding Zika.

15. Why do people say that pregnant mothers should be aware of this virus? The Ministry of Health of Brazil has reported an increase in the numbers of newborns with microcephaly as well as other poor pregnancy outcomes in areas experiencing Zika virus outbreaks. The CDC is conducting research to further characterize the relationship between Zika virus and poor pregnancy outcomes. More studies are planned to learn more about the risks of Zika virus infection during pregnancy. There are many causes of microcephaly in babies, including genetic abnormalities.

16. Is it safe to travel to Florida? Yes, traveling to Florida is safe. Florida’s small case cluster is not considered widespread transmission. The CDC recommends that pregnant women limit unnecessary travel to the impacted area, which is one square mile in Miami-Dade County.  Travelers to Florida should always take precautions to protect against mosquito bites (such as repellents) and sun burns (sun screen, sun glasses).

17. I am pregnant and want to travel to Florida is it safe? Yes, traveling to Florida is safe. Florida’s small case cluster is not considered widespread transmission. The CDC recommends that pregnant women limit unnecessary travel to the impacted area, which is one square mile in Miami-Dade County. Travelers to Florida should always take precautions to protect against mosquito bites (such as repellents) and sun burns (sun screen, sun glasses).

18. Should I postpone my trip to Florida? No, there is no reason related to Zika virus to postpone your travel to Florida. Florida’s small case cluster is not considered widespread transmission.

19. I heard that you can contract Zika virus by sexual contact, is it true? There is evidence to support that men can pass Zika to their male or female sexual partners, and females can pass Zika to their male, and possibly female, sexual partners during vaginal, anal and oral sex – before symptoms start, while symptoms are occurring, as well as after the symptoms end. According to CDC guidance, pregnant woman with sex partners (male or female) who live in or who have traveled to an area with active Zika virus transmission should use barrier methods against infection or do not have sex for the duration of the pregnancy. According to the CDC: – Couples who include a man who has been diagnosed with Zika or had symptoms of Zika should consider using condoms or not having sex for at least 6 months after symptoms begin. This includes men who live in and men who traveled to areas with Zika. – Couples who include a man who traveled to an area with Zika but did not develop symptoms of Zika should consider using condoms or not having sex for at least 8 weeks after their return. – Couples with a non-pregnant female in which one partner has confirmed or suspected Zika virus infection or has traveled to a Zika-endemic area but has not developed symptoms consistent with Zika virus infection should either use barrier methods against infection or abstain from sexual contact.

20. Who can I call to spray for mosquitoes around my house? In Florida, many counties and cities have mosquito control services. Please contact your county or city government offices to find out if these services are available in your area. The mosquitoes that spread Zika breed in small containers so you can also limit your risk by making sure to dump all sources of standing water in bird baths, flower pots, etc. on your property at least weekly.

Additional Information

For more information on mosquito bite prevention visit Florida Department of Health, http://www.floridahealth.gov/diseases-and-conditions/mosquito-borne-diseases/prevention.html and http://www.floridahealth.gov/diseases-and-conditions/zika-virus/index.html
The Center for Disease Control and Prevention, http://www.cdc.gov/zika/ also available in Spanish, http://www.cdc.gov/spanish/mediosdecomunicacion/comunicados/d_recomendaciones_viajeros_virus_ del_zika_011516.html
For Mosquito-borne disease and vector surveillance, please visit, http://www.floridahealth.gov/diseases-and-conditions/mosquito-borne-diseases/surveillance.html and http://www.cdc.gov/zika/vector/index.html

 

 

 

Transportation Hotline

Transportation Hotline

The District has adopted 772-204-RIDE (7433) as its main number for transportation calls.   Improvements to the telephone network and additional staff will support calls to this center as the school year opens.  The transportation call center will be open from 6am to 6pm for the first two weeks of school.