zSpace Is Coming to Town

zSpace Is Coming to Town

I have a fun story opportunity that I thought you might be interested in. It’s happening this Thursday at Fort Pierce Westwood and Samuel S. Gaines Academy of Emerging Technologies and again on Friday at Oak Hammock K-8 and Windmill Point Elementary.

 

The zSpace virtual reality school bus will be parked outside of our scheduled schools so teachers, students, and members of our community can hop aboard and learn about the human heart or hold a 3D butterfly in their hands!

 

Date Time School Address
November 29, 2018 8 AM – 10 AM Fort Pierce Westwood High School 1801 Panther Lane

Fort Pierce, FL 34947

November 29, 2018 Noon – 2:30 PM Samuel S. Gaines Academy of Emerging Technologies 2250 S. Jenkins Road

Ft. Pierce, FL 34947

       
November 30, 2018 9 AM – 11 AM Oak Hammock K-8 1251 S.W. California Blvd.

Port St. Lucie, FL 34953

November 30, 2018 1 PM – 3 PM Windmill Point Elementary 700 Darwin Blvd.

Port St. Lucie, FL 34953

 

Should we keep an eye out for you?

 

 

Zika Resources

Zika Resources

For accurate and up-to-date information and resources on the Zika virus, the following web links from the Florida Health Department in St. Lucie County are valuable resources:

Zika Virus Updates

http://www.floridahealth.gov/diseases-and-conditions/zika-virus/index.html

Spill the Water Campaign

http://www.floridahealth.gov/diseases-and-conditions/spill-the-water/

 

https://youtu.be/ayVop5Dx0YQ

Zika Resources

Zika Resources

For accurate and up-to-date information and resources on the Zika virus, the following web links from the Florida Health Department in St. Lucie County are valuable resources:

Zika Virus Updates

http://www.floridahealth.gov/diseases-and-conditions/zika-virus/index.html

Spill the Water Campaign

http://www.floridahealth.gov/diseases-and-conditions/spill-the-water/

Zika Q and A  (Source: http://www.floridahealth.gov/diseases-and-conditions/zika-virus/_documents/zika-virus-general-faq1.pdf)

Frequently Asked Questions: Zika Virus

1. What is Zika virus? Zika fever is a mild illness caused by a mosquito-borne virus similar to those that cause dengue and chikungunya virus infection. It has been identified in several countries in Central and South America, Mexico, and the Caribbean since 2015. Outbreaks have previously been reported in Africa, Southeast Asia, and the Pacific Islands. Local transmission has been reported in Puerto Rico and in a small area in Miami-Dade County. Zika virus is not transmitted person-to-person.

2. How is Zika virus transmitted? Zika virus is primarily transmitted through the bite of an infected mosquito, including the same mosquitoes that can transmit dengue and chikungunya. It can also be transmitted from a pregnant mother to her baby during pregnancy or around the time of birth. It is unknown how often this occurs or what stage of pregnancy is most at risk. There are no reports of infants getting Zika virus through breastfeeding. In addition, Zika virus can be present in semen and transmitted through sexual activity.

3. Who is at risk of being infected? Anyone who is living in or traveling to an area where Zika virus is found who has not already been infected with Zika virus is at risk for infection, including pregnant women.

4. What are the symptoms of Zika virus infection? Only about 1 in 5 people infected with Zika virus are symptomatic. Zika fever is a mild illness. Severe disease requiring hospitalization is uncommon. Signs and symptoms of Zika virus may include: acute onset of low-grade fever, rash, joint pain, conjunctivitis (reddening of eye), body aches, headache, eye pain and vomiting.

5. How soon do infected people get sick? People typically develop symptoms between 2 and 14 days after they are bitten by the infected mosquito. Zika fever is a mild illness with only 1 out of 5 cases known to show symptoms. Severe cases of the disease is uncommon.

6. What treatment options are available for Zika virus illness? Since there is no specific treatment against the virus, treat the symptoms by getting plenty of rest, drink fluids to prevent dehydration, take medicines to relieve fever and pain. Illness typically resolves within a week.

7. What should I do if I think I have Zika fever? If you feel that you might have Zika fever, please visit your health care provider. A health care provider will determine if the patient is exhibiting symptoms of Zika virus and discuss the patient’s travel history. If appropriate, based on the guidance from the CDC, the health care provider will order a specialized blood test or urine test. All testing has to be ordered by a health care provider, in communication with their department of health and CDC. Travelers returning home from areas with active Zika virus transmission should avoid being bitten by mosquitoes for three weeks following travel, especially while ill, to prevent infection of local mosquitoes. Women who were traveling in areas where Zika virus was active during their pregnancy should consult with their obstetrician.

8. What can I do to prevent the Zika virus? The Florida Department of Health encourages Florida residents and visitors to protect themselves from all mosquito-borne illnesses by draining standing water; covering their skin with repellent and clothing; covering windows with screens; and other basic precautions. DRAIN standing water to stop mosquitoes from multiplying

  • Drain water from garbage cans, house gutters, buckets, pool covers, coolers, toys, flower pots or any other containers where sprinkler or rain water has collected.
  • Discard old tires, drums, bottles, cans, pots and pans, broken appliances and other items that aren’t being used.
  • Empty and clean birdbaths and pet’s water bowls at least once or twice a week.
  • Protect boats and vehicles from rain with tarps that don’t accumulate water.
  • Maintain swimming pools in good condition and appropriately chlorinated. Empty plastic swimming pools when not in use.
    COVER skin with clothing or repellent
  • Clothing – Wear shoes, socks, and long pants and long-sleeves. This type of protection may be necessary for people who must work in areas where mosquitoes are present.
  • Repellent – Apply mosquito repellent to bare skin and clothing.
  • Always use repellents according to the label. Repellents with DEET, picaridin, oil of lemon eucalyptus, and IR3535 are effective.
  • Use mosquito netting to protect children younger than 2 months old.
    COVER doors and windows with screens to keep mosquitoes out of your house
  • Repair broken screening on windows, doors, porches, and patios.

9. Can Zika virus harm pets or livestock? There is no evidence to date that suggests that Zika virus can harm domestic pets or livestock.

10. What is the status of Zika virus in Florida? Florida has identified a small, one-square mile area in Miami-Dade County where active transmission of the virus is likely occurring. Florida’s small case cluster is not considered widespread transmission. The current number of travel and non-travel related cases can be found in the department’s daily Zika update, which is posted on our newsroom page.

11. Do you have Zika virus in Florida? The department has confirmed some non-travel related cases of Zika in Florida and the majority of these cases are related to a small area in Miami-Dade County where active transmission is occurring. There is no active transmission of Zika virus outside of the one-square mile area in Miami-Dade County. Florida has also reported some Zika cases among people who traveled to other countries and contracted the virus there.

12. What is being done to prevent transmission of Zika virus in Florida? Each suspected case of Zika virus infection is tested at the state public health laboratory. County health department staff report suspect Zika fever cases to local mosquito control staff to make sure mosquito control activities are put in place. State and local health departments work closely with other parties to make sure people at risk for Zika virus infections as well as health care providers stay informed with the most current science about Zika fever. We also provide education about effective repellents. These include products with DEET, picaridin, IR 3535 and some oil of lemon eucalyptus and para-methanediol products.

13. Do you think Zika virus will spread in Florida? We know, from our experience with dengue fever and chikungunya virus, which are spread by the same mosquito, that travelers who come back infected can infect local mosquito populations. With what we know from dengue and chikungunya, it is very unlikely we will have large outbreaks of Zika fever in the United States. One major reason for this is that we have better housing with air conditioning and intact screens that protect us from being bitten by mosquitoes in our homes. When locally acquired mosquito-borne illness is present, the department works closely with mosquito control to stop further transmission of the virus of concern. Mosquito control and the health department jointly provide public education whenever possible as well since it is very important that all residents cooperate and drain containers on their property at least weekly to help successfully control this mosquito. We would follow the same protocol for an outbreak of Zika virus.

14. Where can I find the most current information on Zika virus activity in Florida? The department has created a webpage with a variety of resources for the public and health care community. Each day the department updates the website and issues a press release with case count information at 2 p.m. The department continues to proactively communicate with health care professionals, specifically obstetricians, regarding Zika.

15. Why do people say that pregnant mothers should be aware of this virus? The Ministry of Health of Brazil has reported an increase in the numbers of newborns with microcephaly as well as other poor pregnancy outcomes in areas experiencing Zika virus outbreaks. The CDC is conducting research to further characterize the relationship between Zika virus and poor pregnancy outcomes. More studies are planned to learn more about the risks of Zika virus infection during pregnancy. There are many causes of microcephaly in babies, including genetic abnormalities.

16. Is it safe to travel to Florida? Yes, traveling to Florida is safe. Florida’s small case cluster is not considered widespread transmission. The CDC recommends that pregnant women limit unnecessary travel to the impacted area, which is one square mile in Miami-Dade County.  Travelers to Florida should always take precautions to protect against mosquito bites (such as repellents) and sun burns (sun screen, sun glasses).

17. I am pregnant and want to travel to Florida is it safe? Yes, traveling to Florida is safe. Florida’s small case cluster is not considered widespread transmission. The CDC recommends that pregnant women limit unnecessary travel to the impacted area, which is one square mile in Miami-Dade County. Travelers to Florida should always take precautions to protect against mosquito bites (such as repellents) and sun burns (sun screen, sun glasses).

18. Should I postpone my trip to Florida? No, there is no reason related to Zika virus to postpone your travel to Florida. Florida’s small case cluster is not considered widespread transmission.

19. I heard that you can contract Zika virus by sexual contact, is it true? There is evidence to support that men can pass Zika to their male or female sexual partners, and females can pass Zika to their male, and possibly female, sexual partners during vaginal, anal and oral sex – before symptoms start, while symptoms are occurring, as well as after the symptoms end. According to CDC guidance, pregnant woman with sex partners (male or female) who live in or who have traveled to an area with active Zika virus transmission should use barrier methods against infection or do not have sex for the duration of the pregnancy. According to the CDC: – Couples who include a man who has been diagnosed with Zika or had symptoms of Zika should consider using condoms or not having sex for at least 6 months after symptoms begin. This includes men who live in and men who traveled to areas with Zika. – Couples who include a man who traveled to an area with Zika but did not develop symptoms of Zika should consider using condoms or not having sex for at least 8 weeks after their return. – Couples with a non-pregnant female in which one partner has confirmed or suspected Zika virus infection or has traveled to a Zika-endemic area but has not developed symptoms consistent with Zika virus infection should either use barrier methods against infection or abstain from sexual contact.

20. Who can I call to spray for mosquitoes around my house? In Florida, many counties and cities have mosquito control services. Please contact your county or city government offices to find out if these services are available in your area. The mosquitoes that spread Zika breed in small containers so you can also limit your risk by making sure to dump all sources of standing water in bird baths, flower pots, etc. on your property at least weekly.

Additional Information

For more information on mosquito bite prevention visit Florida Department of Health, http://www.floridahealth.gov/diseases-and-conditions/mosquito-borne-diseases/prevention.html and http://www.floridahealth.gov/diseases-and-conditions/zika-virus/index.html
The Center for Disease Control and Prevention, http://www.cdc.gov/zika/ also available in Spanish, http://www.cdc.gov/spanish/mediosdecomunicacion/comunicados/d_recomendaciones_viajeros_virus_ del_zika_011516.html
For Mosquito-borne disease and vector surveillance, please visit, http://www.floridahealth.gov/diseases-and-conditions/mosquito-borne-diseases/surveillance.html and http://www.cdc.gov/zika/vector/index.html

 

 

 

Ziemba Named Innovative Leader in Distance Learning

Ziemba Named Innovative Leader in Distance Learning

ST. LUCIE COUNTY – Jeanne Ziemba, principal of St. Lucie Public School’s (SLPS) Mosaic Digital Academy, will attend this year’s Florida Distance Learning Association (FDLA) annual conference on September 15th as an honoree for the Innovative Leader in Distance Learning: K-12award. Chief Academic Officer Dr. Helen Wild explained that this award is established to recognize excellence and innovation in using technology to enhance teaching and learning. “We’re so excited for her,” said Wild. “Mrs. Ziemba has been the driving force with the vision behind Mosaic since its inception five years ago; she’s deserving of this award.”

Mosaic Digital Academy is a K-12 virtual school that provides a progressive choice for families, providing expanded curriculum choice for anytime, anywhere learning.  “What really makes this learning model attractive to our students and families is how our program engages students by enhancing learning through a variety of virtual and live experiences to support the whole child and preparing them to work cooperatively with others through lab experiences and collaboration projects,” said Ziemba. “Unlike other virtual schools, we offer face-to-face opportunities for our students to participate in school clubs, experience fieldtrips and partake in live lessons on campus with our own highly qualified instructors, to ensure learning goals are met for every student.”

According to FDLA, recipients of this award must be a full-time member of a K-12 or higher education community or institution and demonstrate an innovative project or process involving collaboration with other institutions that improves students’ understanding of any subject matter. In addition, the role of technology, related scholarship evidence, publications, presentations and grants are also considerations.

About St. Lucie Public Schools

St. Lucie Public Schools is a B rated District with no failing schools proudly serving the students as the second highest ranking School District on the Treasure Coast.  The mission of SLPS is to ensure all students graduate from safe and caring schools equipped with the knowledge, skills and desire to succeed. For more information, visit, http://www.stlucieschools.org.

Ziemba Named Innovative Leader in Distance Learning

Ziemba Named Innovative Leader in Distance Learning

Jeanne Ziemba, principal of St. Lucie Public School’s (SLPS) Mosaic Digital Academy, will attend this year’s Florida Distance Learning Association (FDLA) annual conference on September 15th as an honoree for the Innovative Leader in Distance Learning: K-12 award.  Chief Academic Officer Dr. Helen Wild explained that this award is established to recognize excellence and innovation in using technology to enhance teaching and learning. “We’re so excited for her,” said Wild. “Mrs. Ziemba has been the driving force with the vision behind Mosaic since its inception five years ago; she’s deserving of this award.”

Mosaic Digital Academy is a K-12 virtual school that provides a progressive choice for families, providing expanded curriculum choice for anytime, anywhere learning.  “What really makes this learning model attractive to our students and families is how our program engages students by enhancing learning through a variety of virtual and live experiences to support the whole child and preparing them to work cooperatively with others through lab experiences and collaboration projects,” said Ziemba. “Unlike other virtual schools, we offer face-to-face opportunities for our students to participate in school clubs, experience fieldtrips and partake in live lessons on campus with our own highly qualified instructors, to ensure learning goals are met for every student.”

According to FDLA, recipients of this award must be a full-time member of a K-12 or higher education community or institution and demonstrate an innovative project or process involving collaboration with other institutions that improves students’ understanding of any subject matter. In addition, the role of technology, related scholarship evidence, publications, presentations and grants are also considerations.

About St. Lucie Public Schools

St. Lucie Public Schools is a B rated District with no failing schools proudly serving the students as the second highest ranking School District on the Treasure Coast.  The mission of SLPS is to ensure all students graduate from safe and caring schools equipped with the knowledge, skills and desire to succeed. For more information, visit, http://www.stlucieschools.org.

 

 

Ziemba – An Innovator

Ziemba – An Innovator

Jeanne Ziemba, principal of St. Lucie Public School’s Mosaic Digital Academy, was recognized at the October Board meeting for being named as Florida’s Distance Learning Association’s Innovative Leader in Distance Learning: K-12 award recipient.

This award is established to recognize excellence and innovation in using technology to enhance teaching and learning.

Mosaic Digital Academy is a K-12 virtual school that provides a progressive choice for families, providing expanded curriculum choice for anytime, anywhere learning.

Youth Volunteer of the Year named at Floresta Elementary

Youth Volunteer of the Year named at Floresta Elementary

Taylor Currie has been selected as the Youth Volunteer of the Year at Floresta Elementary. Taylor has served at Floresta Elementary for the last two years, helping in the office, assisting with clerical tasks as well as working with students and families.  Taylor provides a valuable resource to teachers and students in the classroom.  This year, Taylor began working with exceptional students, and has decided that she would like to pursue a career in exceptional student  education.

Youth volunteer helps F. K. Sweet students

Youth volunteer helps F. K. Sweet students

Bobby Kemp, a senior at Lincoln Park Academy, was recently chosen as Youth Volunteer at F.K. Sweet Elementary. He has volunteered in Marla Liberatore’s third grade classroom for the last couple of years. Bobby enjoys spending time with the students and does a little bit of everything, from assisting with math and reading, to teaching them the rules of fair play and basketball.

Youth Symposium

Youth Leadership Forum – Restoring the Village

Students from St. Lucie County learned about character, leadership, problem solving, and much more at this year’s Restoring the Village Youth Leadership Symposium.  Coaches and their athletic teams attended from area schools as well as youth groups and leaders from area clubs and organizations.  As this event grows each year, participants are looking forward to next year’s symposium!

 

Your Vote Matters

Your Vote Matters

A special election is coming your way in April. Stay informed about how this will impact the future of our schools and the School District’s ability to recruit and retain quality teachers, ensure a school resource officer on every campus, and enhance mental health services for our children.

Your vote matters. Visit stlucieschools.org to learn more.

#4OurKids

Youngest students delight superintendent with thoughts about school

Youngest students delight superintendent with thoughts about school

Two of the youngest guests to attend the Superintendent’s Learning Lunches this month delighted the superintendent and fellow participants with accounts of their school experiences. Phoebe, left, a pre-kindergarten student at Weatherbee Elementary School, and Windmill Point Elementary School kindergartner Christopher, attended the monthly event in March that invites students, school staff and parents to meet the superintendent at the school district office for a brown bag lunch, and to communicate school activities and concerns.

Young Park Volunteer Twice Honored at State Level

Young Park Volunteer Twice Honored at State Level

Recognizing the success and accomplishments of Justin Lee, a senior at Lincoln Park Academy

For the past 5 years, Justin Lee has volunteered his free time at the Savannas preserve State Park, accumulating more than 2,000 volunteer hours!

Justin is co-founder of the Junior Friends of Savannas, an elite group of teen volunteers at the park.  He has acted as Youth Volunteer Coordinator for two years.  All of Justin’s hard work paid off this month when he was awarded not one, but two state-wide awards.  The Friends of Florida State Parks honored this amazing young man with their 2014 Youth Volunteer of the Year award.  A few days later, Volunteer Florida named Justin Lee a Champion of Service.  Justin received the latter award last week from Governor Scott in Tallahassee.

 

 

Young Floridian Scholarship Winners

Young Floridian Scholarship Winners

For 35 years the Young Floridian Scholarship program has honored the most stellar high school seniors in St. Lucie County. Currently run through the St. Lucie County Chamber of Commerce Foundation, this community-supported program awards scholarships to deserving students with pomp and circumstance at an annual awards ceremony. This year’s winners were announced onstage, the evening of February 20th at Indian River State College’s McAlpin Fine Arts Center. Each winner received a $1,000 scholarship to the college or university of their choice and/or a two-year full scholarship to IRSC. Winners were awarded in 15 categories.

Cameron Slack
Lincoln Park Academy
Academic Excellence
Delmarius Williams
Lincoln Park Academy
Academies/Certifications/Manufacturing
Mateo Restrepo
Port St. Lucie High School
Art
Emma Rose
St. Lucie West Centennial High School
Athletics
Sabrina Dorisca
Treasure Coast High School
Career & Technology
Catherine Ferreira
Fort Pierce Central High School
Computer Science/Engineering & Architecture
Kimberly Harvey
St. Lucie West Centennial High School
Drama
Shanieya Harris
Treasure Coast High School
Foreign Language
Destiny Lerner
Treasure Coast High School
Human Services
Andre Fernandez
Port St. Lucie High School
Journalism & Communications
Sienna Medina
Fort Pierce Central High School
Language Arts
Benjamin Rante-Reyes
Fort Pierce Central High School
Mathematics
MaKayla Torres
Treasure Coast High School
Music
Mason King
Fort Pierce Central High School
Science
Freedom Scholes
Port St. Lucie High School
Social Studies
Congratulations to all the winners!
Young Authors celebration held at Manatee Academy

Young Authors celebration held at Manatee Academy

The St. Lucie County Young Author Celebration sponsored by the St. Lucie County Reading Council was recently held at Manatee Academy. Over 200 parents and students enjoyed author Donna Gephart, a light lunch, book fair and free books and prizes. Pictured is the organization’s Executive Council, who made the event happen, from left, Vince Scotto, Debbie Remington, Wanda Galey, Dorothy Still and Alma Goff.

Young Authors’ Celebration – FAQs

Young Authors’ Celebration – FAQs

The Young Authors’ Celebration is just around the corner.  That means books are due very soon!  Young Author Books are due to  Rivers Edge on 4/30! Please feel free to email Ilyse Brainin if your books will not make the pony in time.

 

St. Lucie County Reading Council’s Young Authors’ Celebration – 2018!

Quick FAQ Sheet

What are the criteria for each school?                                                                               

To encourage creativity and to support school-specific writing initiatives, schools may come up with their own rubric for how they will determine the top authors. SLCRC only requires that books be original text and artwork. Writing can be fiction or non-fiction: a picture book, a report, poetry, a short story… the sky’s the limit!                                                                                                                                 

How many works can each school submit?

It is recommended that each school’s submissions reflect the diversity of the student body – keep your ESE and ELL students in mind when making your selections.                                                                 

Below is the maximum number of works each school may submit:

  • K-5 Schools – 4 Submissions
  • Middle Schools – 3 Submissions
  • High Schools – 4 Submissions
  • K-8 Schools – 7 Submissions

When is the YA Celebration?

May 19th, 2018

Who may attend?

Young Authors selected by each school and their parents/guardians (The invitation states that they can bring 2 guests.)

If Young Authors coordinators are able to attend, we would love to have you come, as well as Young Author’ teachers and school administrators. Please let me know whom from your school is attending so we can ensure we have enough seating and snacks for everyone.

Where is this happening?

Oak Hammock School

What time does it start?

10:00 am

When is it over?

Around 11:30 or 12:00

Will there be a grand prize winner?

All are winnersthis is a celebration of amazing Young Authors in SLC!

What do I do once school winners are selected?

Please email me with the names and grades of the winners for your school by Monday, April 30th.

Do we turn in winning student writing?

Each book submitted should include the student name, grade level, teacher name, and school name. All submissions must be turned in to Rivers Edge, Ilyse Brainin, in pony by Monday, Monday, April 27th.

How are the parents notified?

When the list of Young Authors winners is received, an invitation will be emailed to each school’s contact to give to students.

Do parents RSVP?  

Parents must RSVP to the school contact person if they plan on attending.

Will there be prizes at the Young Authors Celebration?

There will be door prizes!

Will food be served at the celebration?

Light snacks will be served.

* Please contact Ilyse Brainin at Ilyse.Brainin@stlucieschools.org  or Lori Foley at Loriann.foley@stlucieschools.org with any questions or comments.

Young Authors Celebration

Young Authors Celebration

On May 18th, the Treasure Coast Literacy Association hosted its annual Young Authors Celebration at Oak Hammock K-8 School. Parents accompanied their young authors to this festive celebration of literary successes.    .