Education Update and STAR Program

Education Update and STAR Program

St. Lucie County, FL -The Education Foundation of St. Lucie County sponsored the September Economic Development Council members luncheon at the Schreiber Center on the Pruitt Campus of IRSC. The keynote speaker was E. Wayne Gent, Superintendent of St. Lucie Public Schools.

Superintendent E. Wayne Gent provided an educational update during the Economic Development Council’s Investors’ Lunch Meeting. With a focus on the School District’s positive momentum and escalating graduation rates as well as career and technical opportunities, he stressed how the need is greater than ever for the next generation to be prepared to deal with the demands of a complex world and economic realities.

Thom Jones, President of the Education Foundation, made a presentation on a new program called the STAR Scholars and Workforce Readiness Program. This program aligns businesses with specific curriculum in our public high schools to help inspire students to graduate work ready. Local businesses can join the program by becoming a business mentor and working within a specific CTE class (Career & Technical Education). As an example, car dealerships and  automotive repair businesses can sponsor students in the CTE automotive program. Each mentor will introduce students to the particular needs of their business and inspire the student to stay in school. The students can be identified for a future job and a fully prepaid scholarship to help them continue their education while working.

This program was created by the St. Lucie County Education Foundation, a 501 c 3 not for profit organization created to further k-12 public education along with the Florida Prepaid College Foundation and the Consortium of Florida Education Foundations. Local partners include the School District, SLC EDC, The SLC Chamber of Commerce and the Boys and Girls Clubs. The goal is to sponsor 50 HS students for two years, starting at the junior level, who are identified as at-risk students. For more information, please visit www.efslc.org.

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Lights On Afterschool

Lights On Afterschool

On Monday, October 17, 2016, St. Lucie Public Schools will hold its 2nd Annual Lights On Afterschool event.

All community members are invited to attend to help us celebrate this national event and learn more about programs, activities, and opportunities available for your child.

Afterschool programs keep kids safe, help working families, and inspire learning. According to data from the Afterschool Alliance, 15.1 million children are without adult supervision in the afternoon hours.

 

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Support Positive Attendance Habits for Success in School

ST. LUCIE COUNTY – With a month’s worth of attention on the importance of positive attendance, St. Lucie Public Schools and Boys and Girls Clubs of St. Lucie County unite in their message to support making attendance a priority throughout the entire school year.  “September is Attendance Awareness Month. However, with September drawing to a close, we don’t want to lose sight of the importance for our students to be in school every day of every month in order to enhance their opportunities for success,” explained St. Lucie Public Schools Superintendent E. Wayne Gent.

Boys and Girls Clubs of St. Lucie County, Truancy Team and Director of Prevention Services Linda Soto could not agree more. “We are strong advocates for positive academic habits that support students’ success in school and in life. Boys and Girls Clubs of St. Lucie County takes pride in not only our Club members but in all children in St. Lucie County. We believe all children are capable of success and it begins with positive role models.” ATTENDANCE MATTERS!

Here are some things you can do to make school attendance a priority:

  • Talk about the importance of showing up to school every day, make that the expectation.
  • Help your child maintain daily routines, such as finishing homework and getting a good night’s sleep.
  • Try not to schedule dental and medical appointments during the school day.
  • Don’t let your child stay home unless truly sick. Complaints of headaches or stomach aches may be signs of anxiety.

 Help your teen stay engaged.

  • Find out if your child feels engaged by his classes and feels safe from bullies and other threats. Make sure he/she is not missing class because of behavioral issues and school discipline policies. If any of these are problems, work with your school.
  • Stay on top of academic progress and seek help from teachers or tutors if necessary. Make sure teachers know how to contact you.
  • Stay on top of your child’s social contacts. Peer pressure can lead to skipping school, while students without many friends can feel isolated.
  • Encourage meaningful afterschool activities, including sports and clubs.
  • Communicate with the school.
  • Know the school’s attendance policy – incentives and penalties.
  • Talk to teachers if you notice sudden changes in behavior. These could be tied to something going on at school.
  • Check on your child’s attendance to be sure absences are not piling up.
  • Ask for help from school officials, afterschool programs, other parents or community agencies if you’re having trouble getting your child to school.

About St. Lucie Public Schools 

The mission of St. Lucie Public Schools is to ensure all students graduate from safe and caring schools equipped with the knowledge, skills and desire to succeed. For more information visit, www.stlucieschools.org  or contact Kerry Padrick at kerry.padrick@stlucieschools.org.

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Positive Attendance Habits

Positive Attendance Habits

With a month’s worth of attention on the importance of positive attendance, St. Lucie Public Schools and Boys and Girls Clubs of St. Lucie County unite in their message to support making attendance a priority throughout the entire school year. “September is Attendance Awareness Month. However, with September drawing to a close, we don’t want to lose sight of the importance for our students to be in school every day of every month in order to enhance their opportunities for success,” explained St. Lucie Public Schools Superintendent E. Wayne Gent.

Boys and Girls Clubs of St. Lucie County, Truancy Team and Director of Prevention Services Linda Soto could not agree more. “We are strong advocates for positive academic habits that support students’ success in school and in life. Boys and Girls Clubs of St. Lucie County takes pride in not only our Club members but in all children in St. Lucie County. We believe all children are capable of success and it begins with positive role models.” ATTENDANCE MATTERS!

Here are some things you can do to make school attendance a priority:

  • Talk about the importance of showing up to school every day, make that the expectation.
  • Help your child maintain daily routines, such as finishing homework and getting a good night’s sleep.
  • Try not to schedule dental and medical appointments during the school day.
  • Don’t let your child stay home unless truly sick. Complaints of headaches or stomach aches may be signs of anxiety.

Help your teen stay engaged.

  • Find out if your child feels engaged by his classes and feels safe from bullies and other threats. Make sure he/she is not missing class because of behavioral issues and school discipline policies. If any of these are problems, work with your school.
  • Stay on top of academic progress and seek help from teachers or tutors if necessary. Make sure teachers know how to contact you.
  • Stay on top of your child’s social contacts. Peer pressure can lead to skipping school, while students without many friends can feel isolated.
  • Encourage meaningful afterschool activities, including sports and clubs.
  • Communicate with the school.
  • Know the school’s attendance policy – incentives and penalties.
  • Talk to teachers if you notice sudden changes in behavior. These could be tied to something going on at school.
  • Check on your child’s attendance to be sure absences are not piling up.
  • Ask for help from school officials, afterschool programs, other parents or community agencies if you’re having trouble getting your child to school.

dont-let-absenses-add-up