Mosaic Digital Academy students learn physics at the golf course

Mosaic Digital Academy students learn physics at the golf course

Mosaic Digital Academy’s first STEM field experience proved to be a very STEM-ulating day on the golf course. Mosaic students and teachers met at the PGA Golf Training Center in Port St. Lucie to learn the basics of physics and how this science discipline relates to the real-world skills needed in the sport of golf. Steve Shotola, St. Lucie School District Science Curriculum Supervisor, kicked off the day with participants in the computer lab to demonstrate how gravity affects acceleration, free fall, projectile motion, and relative motion. Then it was onto the golf course to put this learning into practical terms. Students learned the basics of golf, while Mark Drenga, the technology specialist/golf instructor, helped make the connections between the basic physics they learned in the classroom to the skills needed in the sport. Students left from this experience with a new interest in the sport of golf, but more importantly, they now have a foundation in physics! STEM stands for science, technology, engineering, and mathematics. These four disciplines are vital in contributing to success in post-secondary institutions and businesses. Most jobs will require at least basic STEM skills. Students who are exposed to STEM field experiences can learn to be problem solvers, innovators, inventors, and logical thinkers. Mosaic’s goal is to provide STEM-infused field experiences for our students throughout their education with us to ensure they have every opportunity to excel in these four disciplines. Pictured is eighth grade Mosaic student Thomas Nikakis.

Mariposa Elementary students master math multiplication tables

Mariposa Elementary students master math multiplication tables

Students in Ashley Thomas’ class at Mariposa Elementary were rewarded with an ice cream party for rocketing into mastering their multiplication facts through the nines. Each day Ms. Thomas quizzed students with 40 multiplication facts until all facts were mastered within a three-minute timeframe. Once students completed the different sets of facts, math coach Theresa MacInnes gave students a four-minute, 80-question facts test to complete. Pictured are Dasha Behrens, Taj Clyde, Khani Ellison, Kayla Green, Carter Heffley, Michael Hunter, Chyna Martinez, Rebecca Mosier, Jessica Sullivan, Anthony Torres, Thomas Duffy, Johann Vianna, Sara Westbrook, Trinity Hardy, and Brooklyn Parks. Other students who mastered their multiplication facts but not pictured are Anthony Borno and Amira Castillo. These students were motivated to work hard and had a great support from home to make this possible. Whether it was listening to multiplication raps, playing around the world, or drill and practice these students made the effort.

Mariposa Elementary students use real world process for observations

Mariposa Elementary students use real world process for observations

Students in Maria Nunez’s fourth grade class at Mariposa Elementary have been conducting oxidation experiments for their science Fair project.  The problem statement was, “Which liquids (distilled water, oil, vinegar, alcohol, milk, or soda) causes oxidation to occur the fastest?” Students were enthralled while observing the process and were using the same principles as scientists in the real world. These future scientists had to use critical thinking to determine the reasons why some liquids oxidize more quickly than others. The experimentation will continue just as real scientists conduct experiments at various times to validate their conclusions. Pictured, from left, are Jacob Guerrero, resource teacher Ann Craton, and Emmanuella Coupet.